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Old 04-23-2007, 08:43 PM   #1  
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Hot regulator/rectifier

How hot should the R/R get? Sometimes when I run the bike the R/R gets pretty hot. how hot is normal? THANKS!
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Old 04-23-2007, 08:50 PM   #2  
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I've never felt mine, but I'd think they get pretty hot. Besides regulating voltage to the battery and the rest of the electrical system they also dispose of unused generated power. This, of course, is done by generating heat. It's actually better for a R/R when you use a more power (extra lights, heated gear, etc.) because it runs cooler.
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Old 04-23-2007, 09:08 PM   #3  
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Thanks Hawk! That makes me feel a little better! You're the man!
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Old 04-24-2007, 01:01 AM   #4  
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There you go brah another satisfied costumer.
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Old 04-24-2007, 10:08 AM   #5  
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I replaced mine iwht a tourmaster, and it still gets quite warm but it does have fins
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Old 04-24-2007, 07:23 PM   #6  
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V = I * R

Voltage equals current times resistance. Resistance does not change. Thus, if current increases so does voltage, and vice versa.

A generator creates electricity because a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field with relative motion between the two creates movement of electrons. The faster the relative motion or the stronger the magnetic field then the more electricity (current) is generated. This is why the voltage at idle is lower than at 5000rpm. Additionally, the generator generates 3 phase AC power. So to convert that to DC the R/R uses a series of diodes to rectify it to DC so it can be used.

As I said before, the regulator part just "bleeds" off the excess current to create heat.

If in doubt, do a search. I'll start you out here: http://faq.f650.com/FAQs/VoltageRectifierFAQ.htm
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Old 04-24-2007, 08:45 PM   #7  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkrider View Post
V = I * R

Voltage equals current times resistance. Resistance does not change. Thus, if current increases so does voltage, and vice versa.

A generator creates electricity because a current-carrying conductor in a magnetic field with relative motion between the two creates movement of electrons. The faster the relative motion or the stronger the magnetic field then the more electricity (current) is generated. This is why the voltage at idle is lower than at 5000rpm. Additionally, the generator generates 3 phase AC power. So to convert that to DC the R/R uses a series of diodes to rectify it to DC so it can be used.

As I said before, the regulator part just "bleeds" off the excess current to create heat.

If in doubt, do a search. I'll start you out here: http://faq.f650.com/FAQs/VoltageRectifierFAQ.htm
i think i'll fall on my 20+ yrs in the electronic field. albiet not in the '3 phase generator' field.

heat is generated by current. period.

there are two ways to generate heat in a regulator. add load to the output & increase the voltage difference between the input & output.

if the input voltage increases and the output voltage must stay the same ( regulator ) adding more load to regulator only adds to the problem.


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Old 04-24-2007, 09:13 PM   #8  
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Tim,

I'm not asking you to go against what you've learned in the last 20+ years, I'm asking you to ADD to the wealth of electrical knowledge that you already have. Look, motorcycle charging systems haven't changed much in the last 30-40 years. I don't think that this "technology" was even taught when you went to school. I'm in the Navy and naval electrical systems are OLD TECH. They have to be. Works fine, lasts long time. And they have to be sailor-proof. Voltage regulators in the Navy aren't even this archaic. It's a waste of energy. BUT, this is essentially a PMG (permanent magnet generator) and thus there is no way to vary the magnetic field as you would in a more modern generator, so you have to do something with the current/voltage that is generated. You can't send it to the battery because it doesn't like to be overcharged. A float charge is just fine, thank you. So the voltage/current is removed by generating heat. Even Electrex, the folks who make the aftermarket R/Rs, say it dissipates heat: "Electrex USAs technical genius is built into its line of regulator rectifiers. Electrex USA RR innovations are designed to stop overcharging and dissipate extra voltage
quickly."

Think of this kind of regulator as a relief valve, wastegate, or flood gate for DC voltage.
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Old 04-24-2007, 09:31 PM   #9  
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well that' s interesting. i will have to go read more about the motorcycle charging systems ( would never say i know everything ).

i started my training in the USAF so i'm not suprised you navy guys have a different electrical system than the rest of us.


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Old 04-24-2007, 09:32 PM   #10  
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Yeah, things were floating LONG before they were flying.

There are also many, many more planes in the ocean than there are ships in the sky.
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Old 04-24-2007, 09:53 PM   #11  
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this is interesting

http://www.electrosport.com/electros..._charging.html




yes, lots of boats. we were walking before that though. lets go find a marine & ask him.


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Old 04-25-2007, 05:48 PM   #12  
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Yeah! Great stuff, eh? I do wish they'd get the field controlled generator technology to the point where they are simple and reliable enough for motorcycle use. If they are, then why are Honda not using them? This is the type we use in Naval electrical systems, though a bit more complicated. It only makes sense to vary the magnetic flux to achieve the desired voltage, yes?
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Old 04-25-2007, 06:02 PM   #13  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkrider View Post
Yeah, things were floating LONG before they were flying.

There are also many, many more planes in the ocean than there are ships in the sky.
Hahahahahahahaha - I first heard this from my dad when I was a small kid - he was a WWII Britsih naval flier, on the North Atlantic convoys, where they had far more casualties from men falling into the sea than being shot down.
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Old 04-26-2007, 08:43 AM   #14  
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I just changed my R/R with an aftermarket one with cooling fins. My stock one is toast and took the battery out with it.
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