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New bike, new issues

Old 08-02-2011, 07:47 AM
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New bike, new issues

As I'm sure everybody knows by now, I picked up a 2001 red one last week and no longer mearly a dismantler ;P

I do have a few issues I wanted to run by you guys for some good advice.

First is the manual cct install. I already posted in the general section a plea for some help with the install, but if I find no volunteers I will be tackling the task by myself this weekend.

Here's the question: is it recommended to remove to cover of the front or rear head when changing to the manual cct's or is the process safe keeping them in place. I read somewhere that the gasket is reusable, or should I just replace it with a new one? (I already have one, btw)

When I was adjusting the spring on the right fork leg, it kept clicking when I was turning it. I did the same for the left spring (both to the point that four lines were showing), and the left was smooth, no clicking what-so-ever. Is this normal for the newer bikes (ie 2001 and up?) or is the right fork messed up? if so, what do you think is wrong with it and what should I do to fix it?

Staying on the fork, what would be the best thing to do to firm up the front to eliminate excessive diving. I read that stiffer springs are the ticket, is there a specific brand/make that is considered to be the best? I'm 180lbs, ~200lbs fully suited up.

I have a complete R1 setup, but the forks are considerably shorter. Do you think it's a good mod to swap it up? really not into wheelies and the whole stunting scene, just like to go fast and read that puting up shorter forks will make the bike much more wheelie prone. Any input will be much appreciated, TIA.

Last edited by redhawk98; 08-02-2011 at 07:51 AM.
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Old 08-02-2011, 08:40 AM
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I didn't do my CCTs, so can't help you with that part. As for the forks, replacing the valves and springs will do wonders for you.

I'd be suspicious of the shorter R1 setup, but might depend on the length. I have found that the front characteristics are pretty sensitive to even a small amount of moving the triple down making it very touchy. I run a steering stablilzer, especially on the track.
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Old 08-02-2011, 09:03 AM
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If you haven't done it, I would recommend taking at least the rear and probably both cylinder covers off. It is completely doable without this, and will add some time to the install, but if you're paranoid about the CCT's or very new to it, taking the covers off will help a lot. It makes double checking your work very easy and if the bike has quite a few miles on it you can check the valve clearances while you're in there if you want.

As far as the R1 swap- I'm not sure how much shorter they are, but if you have clipons you can mount them below the triple to gain you some room (on the stock bike they are mounted above, using a good deal of fork real estate). I'd search for threads related to changing the geometry of the bike... short forks don't just cause wheelies, they also greatly change how the bike handles as well as ground clearance...
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Old 08-02-2011, 09:11 AM
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It is better to remove both covers to be sure of what you are doing.. Instructions for the lazy but mostly safe way of just removing the rear are available in my signature.

The cover gaskets are totally reusable, and you don't need new ones. You do need gaskets for the CCTs though.
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Old 08-02-2011, 11:34 AM
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Definately take off at least the rear cover. Most people put too much tension on the manual cct adjuster bolt. It will most likely feel too loose to you, but they should barely be finger tight. I always double check mine by looking how much the chain is pushed in after i take off the head cover. I also measure the stock cct to see how much the adjuster sticks out, and compare it to the manual cct. Best thing to do is adjust it by ear or feel with the engine running. That is slowly back out the adjusting bolt until you hear chain noise, or you feel tapping on the adjuster bolt, then tighten until noise is gone. Also,when removing the stock cct make sure to release chain tension slowly by backing out the screws a little at a time, and make sure the tensioner moves out too and is not stuck to the block. It is not a hard job, but definately something you don't want to screw up.
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Old 08-02-2011, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by redhawk98 View Post
As I'm sure everybody knows by now, I picked up a 2001 red one last week and no longer mearly a dismantler ;P

I do have a few issues I wanted to run by you guys for some good advice.

First is the manual cct install. I already posted in the general section a plea for some help with the install, but if I find no volunteers I will be tackling the task by myself this weekend.

Here's the question: is it recommended to remove to cover of the front or rear head when changing to the manual cct's or is the process safe keeping them in place. I read somewhere that the gasket is reusable, or should I just replace it with a new one? (I already have one, btw)

When I was adjusting the spring on the right fork leg, it kept clicking when I was turning it. I did the same for the left spring (both to the point that four lines were showing), and the left was smooth, no clicking what-so-ever. Is this normal for the newer bikes (ie 2001 and up?) or is the right fork messed up? if so, what do you think is wrong with it and what should I do to fix it?

Staying on the fork, what would be the best thing to do to firm up the front to eliminate excessive diving. I read that stiffer springs are the ticket, is there a specific brand/make that is considered to be the best? I'm 180lbs, ~200lbs fully suited up.

I have a complete R1 setup, but the forks are considerably shorter. Do you think it's a good mod to swap it up? really not into wheelies and the whole stunting scene, just like to go fast and read that puting up shorter forks will make the bike much more wheelie prone. Any input will be much appreciated, TIA.

Where in the world did you hear that a shorter fork would make a bike wheelie prone?! That completely backwards logic if you ask me...

A shorter fork puts the bike in a more leaned forward stance, with more weight on the front wheel, so it should most definetly make the bike less wheelie prone... It does however affect steering geometry, making the bike more quick steering, and perhaps a bit nervous...

Also, the fork being shorter isn't the whole truth... The effective lenght of a shorter fork with a correct spring, is usually not that far from the stock VTR fork with wimpy spring, once you are sitting on the bike compressing the stock fork a lot more...

however, a R1 triple tree will be a PITA to fit on the steering head, making it a necessity to do a mix and match with other parts, making it an interesting adventure with no given answers to a lot of your questions... Ie, I would definetly advice to pick another donor bike... A while ago I made a thread with a long list of the working solutions that people have already mapped out for you and others to follow... Search a bit and it's easy to find...
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Old 08-02-2011, 05:28 PM
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Here is that post, BTW:

https://www.superhawkforum.com/forum...p-guide-23751/

I once had my ear chewed off for suggesting folks stay to a recipe so I will not weigh in on using R1 forks ;P
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Old 08-03-2011, 11:49 AM
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Thanks for the responses, what I really want to know is if the right fork is messed up, my 98 forks were both smooth when adjusting, this one is not, it clicks but only the right one. Any one has any idea what could cause this or is this normal?

Is there a spring (spring/valve set, whatever the case may be) make/brand that is considered to be better than the rest? If so, which one is it? With my weight, which one should I get?

Originally Posted by redhawk98 View Post
When I was adjusting the spring on the right fork leg, it kept clicking when I was turning it. I did the same for the left spring (both to the point that four lines were showing), and the left was smooth, no clicking what-so-ever. Is this normal for the newer bikes (ie 2001 and up?) or is the right fork messed up? if so, what do you think is wrong with it and what should I do to fix it?

Staying on the fork, what would be the best thing to do to firm up the front to eliminate excessive diving. I read that stiffer springs are the ticket, is there a specific brand/make that is considered to be the best? I'm 180lbs, ~200lbs fully suited up.
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Old 08-03-2011, 03:14 PM
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Originally Posted by redhawk98 View Post
Thanks for the responses, what I really want to know is if the right fork is messed up, my 98 forks were both smooth when adjusting, this one is not, it clicks but only the right one. Any one has any idea what could cause this or is this normal?

Is there a spring (spring/valve set, whatever the case may be) make/brand that is considered to be better than the rest? If so, which one is it? With my weight, which one should I get?
First, the clicking is no big deal. It is just the steel washer skipping over the top of the spring while you are turning the adjuster. So like i said, nothing to worry about.

Now to set up your forks, you have 2 options.

First, do them yourself. If you go this route, the most common "brand" used is Race-Tech. You can go to their web site and and you can find out the spring rate for your weight and which valves you would need to buy.

Then you need to disassemble your forks and modify the shim stack. If you are comfortable doing all this and have the tools needed, then it is not all that difficult.

The second option is to send them to Jamie at Daugherty Motorsports - Motorcycle Suspension Performance and Modification As for what he charges, send him a PM and tell him what you want and he can tell you the costs. SuperHawk Forum - View Profile: JamieDaugherty

This is the way to go if you are unsure or uncomfortable working with suspension parts.
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